Previous Project Stages

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In the fall of 2022, we began engaging with people across the province on how we’ll supply power to Saskatchewan beyond 2030.

Stage 1: Getting to Know You – Now Complete

In this stage we asked Saskatchewan residents:

  • how they want to participate in the engagement process
  • what supply options they’d like to learn more about
  • what opportunities they see for the future

From September to November 2022, we reported:

  • 13,300 site visits to saskpower.com/engage
  • 450 online learning session views
  • 240 completed surveys
  • 160 visioning workshop participants

Read the Stage 1 What We Heard Report or the Summary.

Stage 2: Understanding Your Priorities – Now Complete

In this stage we asked Saskatchewan residents about the power supply options they preferred. We also learned which values and priorities were most important in key areas such as:

  • Cost and technology
  • Emissions and environment
  • Human and social factors

From Nov. 16, 2022 to April 6, 2023 we had:

  • 14,600 visits to saskpower.com/engage
  • 15,323 completed surveys
  • 174 completed quick polls
  • 42 ideas submitted
  • 43 questions answered

Read the Stage 2 What We Heard report or the Summary.


In the fall of 2022, we began engaging with people across the province on how we’ll supply power to Saskatchewan beyond 2030.

Stage 1: Getting to Know You – Now Complete

In this stage we asked Saskatchewan residents:

  • how they want to participate in the engagement process
  • what supply options they’d like to learn more about
  • what opportunities they see for the future

From September to November 2022, we reported:

  • 13,300 site visits to saskpower.com/engage
  • 450 online learning session views
  • 240 completed surveys
  • 160 visioning workshop participants

Read the Stage 1 What We Heard Report or the Summary.

Stage 2: Understanding Your Priorities – Now Complete

In this stage we asked Saskatchewan residents about the power supply options they preferred. We also learned which values and priorities were most important in key areas such as:

  • Cost and technology
  • Emissions and environment
  • Human and social factors

From Nov. 16, 2022 to April 6, 2023 we had:

  • 14,600 visits to saskpower.com/engage
  • 15,323 completed surveys
  • 174 completed quick polls
  • 42 ideas submitted
  • 43 questions answered

Read the Stage 2 What We Heard report or the Summary.


Ask a Question

The power industry is changing like never before. Advancements and new technologies emerge every day — impacting how our power system will look in the future. If it seems like a lot to keep up with, it is!

We’re looking into these technologies to see if they’re the right fit for our province.

Ask us a question below, we'd love to hear from you!

Comments and questions that are disrespectful will be removed. For a quicker response, please submit your questions individually.

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    Are there any power generation systems in operations where the electrons are not already fully committed? Might there be a project where an algae cultivation project to utilize both the electrons and also use CO2 from plant operations would be considered? We are looking for a pilot project partner for an application under the Alberta Government's ERA $40 Emerging Innovators SME EOI call (Dec 14,2023 deadline). We are looking to scale up our technology under this or perhaps a Saskatchewan similar incentive, to demonstrate an effective ghg mitigation project that involves taking down CO2 under conditions of Direct Air Capture (DAC) and simply sequestering the biomass by pumping it into a deep reservoir or reutilizing the biomass for economic sustainability projects: low carbon fuels, SAF, food, livestock feed, biopesticides, etc. while also improving water quality. ERA background report: https://eralberta.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/B0150002_UofA_Food-Fibre-and-Bio_PUBLIC_Final-Report.pdf

    Stantheman asked 4 months ago

    We're aware of this technology, and are definitely keeping an eye on it. If and when it comes to commercial operation, it could an interesting low-carbon generation option. Until then, our mission is ensuring reliable, sustainable and cost-effective power for our customers and the communities we serve.

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    Main sources of Power??

    Beverly asked 3 months ago

    We rely on several power supply options to keep the lights on in Saskatchewan. Our current generating capacity includes:

    • 39% - Natural gas
    • 24% - Conventional coal
    • 21% - Hydro and hydro imports
    • 11% - Wind
    • 3% - Other (flare gas, biomass, etc.)
    • 2% - Solar

    You can also view a daily snapshot of where your power comes here: Where Your Power Comes From (saskpower.com)

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    What is the earliest time that nuclear generation may be available in Sask.

    Dennis asked 4 months ago

    Thanks for your question. Our Small Modular Reactor (SMR) development project is in a multiyear planning phase to inform a construction decision in 2029. This would put Saskatchewan’s first potential SMR in service by 2034.  

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    Hi as a millwright and someone who follows the power industry, I am wondering is there any talk off new hydro projects . I see that hydro Quebec and Ontario power are looking at new projects. Even Alberta has some hydro projects that are being evaluated, even pumped hydro.That being said is I guess cost is a big factor,site c foe example.Another question is there other refurbishment and up power projects ,due to new technology,besides eb cambel?

    curtiskutnikoff asked 4 months ago

    Thanks for your question! With our flatter terrain, Saskatchewan doesn’t have the same hydro resource as some other provinces. Many years ago, some of the most economic hydro resources were developed to provide electricity and will continue to provide power to Saskatchewan for the foreseeable future. There is some potential for future hydro development but there are several factors that impact the cost of hydro for Saskatchewan:

    • Some of our project options are in northern Saskatchewan, far from where most of the power is needed (unless industrial demand from the northern mining sector increases)
    • These, as well as the potential larger projects further south (e.g. Saskatchewan River and Churchill River systems) would need careful study to determine costs, impacts and benefits
    • Hydro has high capital cost and takes years of investigation, design work and large up-front investments on specific projects to determine likely costs and impacts – development takes at least 12 years
    • The environmental impacts make licensing hydro facilities challenging and, as with all new construction, Rightsholders and stakeholder interests must be considered


    Pumped hydro is one of the low/non-emitting options that we’re considering for the future. One point to note is that pumped hydro as a whole is ultimately net negative in power generation. This is because the system uses more power pumping the water back up to the high reservoir than it generates by releasing the water through the turbine.

    SaskPower has plans for life extension work at Coteau Creek Hydroelectric station in the coming years and at other facilities as equipment condition warrants. Options for adding generating capability at some existing facilities will be evaluated as well.

Page last updated: 10 Jan 2024, 10:00 AM