Contribute to the Future Supply Plan

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In 2022, we started talking to Saskatchewan people about how the province is powered. That’s because our power system is changing, and we’re in the process of updating our Long-Term Supply Plan.

In Stages 1 and 2 of the process we asked people about their values, priorities and about the power supply options they preferred. And then we used this information to develop scenarios that show what our power system could look like in the future. In Stage 3 we asked for thoughts about four scenarios that define possible pathways to net zero.

Stage 4

Our Long-Term Supply Plan is a roadmap. It provides direction for decision-makers to ensure we can continue to provide reliable, sustainable and cost-effective power to 2050. But before we can finalize the 2024 plan, we want to know if you think we’re on the right track.

The heart of the Long-Term Supply Plan is in the lessons we learned and our recommendations for the future. We created these using:

  • Public input from surveys, workshops and other engagement activities
  • Technical findings and assessments from our internal supply planning process

Find the lessons and recommendations in our Long-Term Supply Plan: Draft Summary.

Our public survey and workshops have concluded, but we are still accepting written responses until May 21.

Submit a written response - Submit a formal response on behalf of an organization here.

In 2022, we started talking to Saskatchewan people about how the province is powered. That’s because our power system is changing, and we’re in the process of updating our Long-Term Supply Plan.

In Stages 1 and 2 of the process we asked people about their values, priorities and about the power supply options they preferred. And then we used this information to develop scenarios that show what our power system could look like in the future. In Stage 3 we asked for thoughts about four scenarios that define possible pathways to net zero.

Stage 4

Our Long-Term Supply Plan is a roadmap. It provides direction for decision-makers to ensure we can continue to provide reliable, sustainable and cost-effective power to 2050. But before we can finalize the 2024 plan, we want to know if you think we’re on the right track.

The heart of the Long-Term Supply Plan is in the lessons we learned and our recommendations for the future. We created these using:

  • Public input from surveys, workshops and other engagement activities
  • Technical findings and assessments from our internal supply planning process

Find the lessons and recommendations in our Long-Term Supply Plan: Draft Summary.

Our public survey and workshops have concluded, but we are still accepting written responses until May 21.

Submit a written response - Submit a formal response on behalf of an organization here.

Ask a Question

The power industry is changing like never before. Advancements and new technologies emerge every day — impacting how our power system will look in the future. If it seems like a lot to keep up with, it is!

We’re looking into these technologies to see if they’re the right fit for our province.

Ask us a question below, we'd love to hear from you!

Comments and questions that are disrespectful will be removed.

For a quicker response, please submit your questions individually.

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  • Share How do you project the number of SaskPower customers - residential and industrial - each year for the period from 2024 to 2050 (given the current customer base of 550,000)? on Facebook Share How do you project the number of SaskPower customers - residential and industrial - each year for the period from 2024 to 2050 (given the current customer base of 550,000)? on Twitter Share How do you project the number of SaskPower customers - residential and industrial - each year for the period from 2024 to 2050 (given the current customer base of 550,000)? on Linkedin Email How do you project the number of SaskPower customers - residential and industrial - each year for the period from 2024 to 2050 (given the current customer base of 550,000)? link

    How do you project the number of SaskPower customers - residential and industrial - each year for the period from 2024 to 2050 (given the current customer base of 550,000)?

    ttbclav asked about 2 months ago

    Hi there! Mass market customers (residential, small business, etc.) are forecast based on historic and predicted population, as well as other statistical and economic factors that are known to impact customer growth. Some examples are resource production forecasts, household size, and GDP. The industrial customer group is well understood and forecast on an individual basis with collaboration from the customers themselves as well as their respective SaskPower account manager.

  • Share Last question before you block me - A number of Electrical Engineers in Alberta presented a plan to the Alberta Government which was the creation of a Western Canadian Grid - between BC, AB, Sask & MB. The interprovincial grid connected primarily renewable sources of energy and would successfully reach our net zero goals while providing reliable power for the 4 provinces. Has this been looked into? AB residents faced a the risk of a total blackout & raised the revenues of the power companies while a viable solutions are available that do not add to the bottom lines of private companies. Will you add a Western Canadian Grid to your search for reliable cost efficient and green energy to your planning? on Facebook Share Last question before you block me - A number of Electrical Engineers in Alberta presented a plan to the Alberta Government which was the creation of a Western Canadian Grid - between BC, AB, Sask & MB. The interprovincial grid connected primarily renewable sources of energy and would successfully reach our net zero goals while providing reliable power for the 4 provinces. Has this been looked into? AB residents faced a the risk of a total blackout & raised the revenues of the power companies while a viable solutions are available that do not add to the bottom lines of private companies. Will you add a Western Canadian Grid to your search for reliable cost efficient and green energy to your planning? on Twitter Share Last question before you block me - A number of Electrical Engineers in Alberta presented a plan to the Alberta Government which was the creation of a Western Canadian Grid - between BC, AB, Sask & MB. The interprovincial grid connected primarily renewable sources of energy and would successfully reach our net zero goals while providing reliable power for the 4 provinces. Has this been looked into? AB residents faced a the risk of a total blackout & raised the revenues of the power companies while a viable solutions are available that do not add to the bottom lines of private companies. Will you add a Western Canadian Grid to your search for reliable cost efficient and green energy to your planning? on Linkedin Email Last question before you block me - A number of Electrical Engineers in Alberta presented a plan to the Alberta Government which was the creation of a Western Canadian Grid - between BC, AB, Sask & MB. The interprovincial grid connected primarily renewable sources of energy and would successfully reach our net zero goals while providing reliable power for the 4 provinces. Has this been looked into? AB residents faced a the risk of a total blackout & raised the revenues of the power companies while a viable solutions are available that do not add to the bottom lines of private companies. Will you add a Western Canadian Grid to your search for reliable cost efficient and green energy to your planning? link

    Last question before you block me - A number of Electrical Engineers in Alberta presented a plan to the Alberta Government which was the creation of a Western Canadian Grid - between BC, AB, Sask & MB. The interprovincial grid connected primarily renewable sources of energy and would successfully reach our net zero goals while providing reliable power for the 4 provinces. Has this been looked into? AB residents faced a the risk of a total blackout & raised the revenues of the power companies while a viable solutions are available that do not add to the bottom lines of private companies. Will you add a Western Canadian Grid to your search for reliable cost efficient and green energy to your planning?

    Kelly28 asked about 2 months ago

    Thanks for your question! We’re aware of discussions to create a stronger Western Canadian Grid. We recognize the importance of interconnections with our neighbours and are exploring opportunities to increase our interconnections with them. While interconnections have existed for decades, they’re becoming increasingly important today because:

    • They enhance resiliency to power system vulnerability caused by climate-driven extreme weather by acting as a good back-up for emergency situations.
    • They have the potential to increase flexibility by supporting the growth of intermittent renewable generation in our supply mix.
    • They enable us to explore supply options over a larger geographical area and with additional partners, potentially resulting in a more advantageous position and lower overall costs for generation development compared to relying solely on in-province resources.
    • They allow us to import low- or non-GHG emitting power.
    • They can be used to earn revenue by exporting energy from Saskatchewan.


    However, there are also challenges to creating a Western Canadian Grid. Some of those challenges include:

    • Funding. The anticipated costs for establishing a Western Canadian Grid are on the order of billions of dollars, with funding sources remaining unclear.
    • Timeline. It’s estimated it would take 10 years or longer to build a Western Canadian Grid. This is too long to help the transition from conventional coal that’s set to retire by 2030 due to federal regulations.
    • Permitting. The approvals on interprovincial projects are complex and not guaranteed.
    • Other jurisdictions. Interconnections can be expanded beyond a Western Canadian Grid, so we’d need to evaluate if a western grid provides advantages over other grid expansions (for example – into the U.S.).
  • Share An article in The Energy Mix theenergy.mix.com "Failed US Nuclear Project Raises Cost Concerns for Canadian SMR Development" NOv 10, 2023 Excellent report on the expensive subsidization of nuclear energy with taxpayer money - est. cost increased 53% over earlier estimates. as we know is Sask like the PA Hospital costs rising 1/4 of a billion within months due to - well no one really knows - how will the current estimates of $5 billion for each SMR be paid for ? the cost overuns? The project NuScale Power Corp terminated their commercial SMR project as it was bankrupting them - how will Sask Power and a SP government that uses taxpayer $ like monopoly money guarantee a project on budget that actually works as SMR's are untested technology? on Facebook Share An article in The Energy Mix theenergy.mix.com "Failed US Nuclear Project Raises Cost Concerns for Canadian SMR Development" NOv 10, 2023 Excellent report on the expensive subsidization of nuclear energy with taxpayer money - est. cost increased 53% over earlier estimates. as we know is Sask like the PA Hospital costs rising 1/4 of a billion within months due to - well no one really knows - how will the current estimates of $5 billion for each SMR be paid for ? the cost overuns? The project NuScale Power Corp terminated their commercial SMR project as it was bankrupting them - how will Sask Power and a SP government that uses taxpayer $ like monopoly money guarantee a project on budget that actually works as SMR's are untested technology? on Twitter Share An article in The Energy Mix theenergy.mix.com "Failed US Nuclear Project Raises Cost Concerns for Canadian SMR Development" NOv 10, 2023 Excellent report on the expensive subsidization of nuclear energy with taxpayer money - est. cost increased 53% over earlier estimates. as we know is Sask like the PA Hospital costs rising 1/4 of a billion within months due to - well no one really knows - how will the current estimates of $5 billion for each SMR be paid for ? the cost overuns? The project NuScale Power Corp terminated their commercial SMR project as it was bankrupting them - how will Sask Power and a SP government that uses taxpayer $ like monopoly money guarantee a project on budget that actually works as SMR's are untested technology? on Linkedin Email An article in The Energy Mix theenergy.mix.com "Failed US Nuclear Project Raises Cost Concerns for Canadian SMR Development" NOv 10, 2023 Excellent report on the expensive subsidization of nuclear energy with taxpayer money - est. cost increased 53% over earlier estimates. as we know is Sask like the PA Hospital costs rising 1/4 of a billion within months due to - well no one really knows - how will the current estimates of $5 billion for each SMR be paid for ? the cost overuns? The project NuScale Power Corp terminated their commercial SMR project as it was bankrupting them - how will Sask Power and a SP government that uses taxpayer $ like monopoly money guarantee a project on budget that actually works as SMR's are untested technology? link

    An article in The Energy Mix theenergy.mix.com "Failed US Nuclear Project Raises Cost Concerns for Canadian SMR Development" NOv 10, 2023 Excellent report on the expensive subsidization of nuclear energy with taxpayer money - est. cost increased 53% over earlier estimates. as we know is Sask like the PA Hospital costs rising 1/4 of a billion within months due to - well no one really knows - how will the current estimates of $5 billion for each SMR be paid for ? the cost overuns? The project NuScale Power Corp terminated their commercial SMR project as it was bankrupting them - how will Sask Power and a SP government that uses taxpayer $ like monopoly money guarantee a project on budget that actually works as SMR's are untested technology?

    Kelly28 asked about 2 months ago

    We’re aware that on Nov. 8, 2023, Portland-based NuScale and Utah Associated Municipal Power Systems mutually decided to cancel the small modular reactor (SMR) project set to be built in Idaho, largely due to the availability of lower-cost generation sources such as unabated natural gas and coal. 

    SaskPower has selected the GE Hitachi BWRX-300 reactor design in part due to this technology’s readiness for deployment, along with generation size, fuel type and cost. The BWRX is based on a proven design currently in operation around the world and was selected alongside Ontario Power Generation (OPG), who will deploy the BWRX first. 

    We’re committed to ensuring we can continue to provide safe, reliable, cost-effective power to customers in the future. We’re collaborating with OPG as they’re an experienced nuclear operator with a recent track record of completing nuclear projects on time and on budget. They’re currently in the process of extending the life of a four-reactor nuclear power facility and have completed the refurbishment of one of the units well ahead of schedule and on budget.  

    At the end of the day, SMRs will have to be cost-competitive with other sources of baseload, GHG emissions-free generation options, and make economic sense for Saskatchewan for us to proceed. Based on feasibility work done to date, SMRs have the potential to be a competitive option. If we decide to construct an SMR, two things will help mitigate cost overruns:

    • The modularity aspect of SMRs in general. Modular in Small Modular Reactor, means some of the power plant can be built in a factory setting and assembled on site. This reduces the risk of construction cost overruns.
    • Based on the completion of the same SMR design by Ontario Power Generation, SaskPower will work with OPG to better understand potential costs to inform our final investment decision in 2029 to build an SMR in Saskatchewan.
  • Share In the report you neglect to provide the survey participants #'s regarding support for various power generation forms obtained from the survey. In particular I would like to see the actual numbers of Sask residents that support & oppose SMR's. I would also like to see how the Government intends to finance SMR's - where the waste will be deposited and the decommissioning plans. Also given the drought this year and in future years, the irrigation plans for Diefenbaker how will the water requirements be met for the SMR plant? So many more questions that have to date been ignored by the Minister & Moe on Facebook Share In the report you neglect to provide the survey participants #'s regarding support for various power generation forms obtained from the survey. In particular I would like to see the actual numbers of Sask residents that support & oppose SMR's. I would also like to see how the Government intends to finance SMR's - where the waste will be deposited and the decommissioning plans. Also given the drought this year and in future years, the irrigation plans for Diefenbaker how will the water requirements be met for the SMR plant? So many more questions that have to date been ignored by the Minister & Moe on Twitter Share In the report you neglect to provide the survey participants #'s regarding support for various power generation forms obtained from the survey. In particular I would like to see the actual numbers of Sask residents that support & oppose SMR's. I would also like to see how the Government intends to finance SMR's - where the waste will be deposited and the decommissioning plans. Also given the drought this year and in future years, the irrigation plans for Diefenbaker how will the water requirements be met for the SMR plant? So many more questions that have to date been ignored by the Minister & Moe on Linkedin Email In the report you neglect to provide the survey participants #'s regarding support for various power generation forms obtained from the survey. In particular I would like to see the actual numbers of Sask residents that support & oppose SMR's. I would also like to see how the Government intends to finance SMR's - where the waste will be deposited and the decommissioning plans. Also given the drought this year and in future years, the irrigation plans for Diefenbaker how will the water requirements be met for the SMR plant? So many more questions that have to date been ignored by the Minister & Moe link

    In the report you neglect to provide the survey participants #'s regarding support for various power generation forms obtained from the survey. In particular I would like to see the actual numbers of Sask residents that support & oppose SMR's. I would also like to see how the Government intends to finance SMR's - where the waste will be deposited and the decommissioning plans. Also given the drought this year and in future years, the irrigation plans for Diefenbaker how will the water requirements be met for the SMR plant? So many more questions that have to date been ignored by the Minister & Moe

    Kelly28 asked about 2 months ago

    Hi there! We asked about specific supply options in our Stage 2 survey. You can find the full results of that survey in our Stage 2 What We Heard report here, but we’ve also included the ‘Support for Generation Options’ for nuclear here:

    • 39.4% strongly support
    • 25.8% somewhat support
    • 10.7% somewhat oppose
    • 14.8% strongly oppose
    • 9.4% don’t know


    These numbers largely align with other publicly available research, such as Environics Research’s 2023 ‘Public Attitudes to Nuclear Power’ research which can be found here.

    Based on early estimates, electricity from the GE-Hitachi small modular reactor (SMR) could be cost competitive with alternative base load, zero emissions generation options available in the early to mid 2030s. Based on the completion of the same SMR design by Ontario Power Generation by the end of 2028, SaskPower will have highly reliable cost estimates by the time a final investment decision is made in 2029 to build an SMR in Saskatchewan.

    Water availability is a key consideration for a the SMR project. We’re working closely with the Water Security Agency, who allocates water for things like power generation and irrigation projects, and we’re conducting our own water availability study to help ensure that wherever our final site is, there will be sufficient water for the life of the facility. 

    Before receiving a licence to construct and a license to operate a nuclear power facility our lifecycle regulator, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC), requires that plans for waste management and decommissioning are developed. Producing these types of plans prior to licencing is unique to the nuclear industry. Through the planning phase of the SMR development project we’re working towards developing these plans. If you’re interested in learning more, please visit the CNSC’s website.

  • Share Does SaskPower consider emerging energy storage technologies developed in Europe, such as those described earlier this week at https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2024/apr/01/thermal-energy-storage-industry?CMP=share_btn_url or does it restrict its analyses to North American technology? on Facebook Share Does SaskPower consider emerging energy storage technologies developed in Europe, such as those described earlier this week at https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2024/apr/01/thermal-energy-storage-industry?CMP=share_btn_url or does it restrict its analyses to North American technology? on Twitter Share Does SaskPower consider emerging energy storage technologies developed in Europe, such as those described earlier this week at https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2024/apr/01/thermal-energy-storage-industry?CMP=share_btn_url or does it restrict its analyses to North American technology? on Linkedin Email Does SaskPower consider emerging energy storage technologies developed in Europe, such as those described earlier this week at https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2024/apr/01/thermal-energy-storage-industry?CMP=share_btn_url or does it restrict its analyses to North American technology? link

    Does SaskPower consider emerging energy storage technologies developed in Europe, such as those described earlier this week at https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2024/apr/01/thermal-energy-storage-industry?CMP=share_btn_url or does it restrict its analyses to North American technology?

    ttbclav asked about 2 months ago

    Thanks for your question! We monitor emerging energy storage worldwide for ones that may potentially be well suited to our operating environment. As far as energy storage goes, thermal energy storage is one of the technologies that we’re looking at for the future. Right now, we’re just starting to build batteries. Our internal analysis has shown that batteries can provide the best value when used to balance the grid and to stabilize the local transmission system in the short term (less than one hour). The Battery Energy Storage System (BESS) near Regina is the first of its kind in the province and is capable of powering 20 megawatts of load for up to one hour. Learn more about BESS.

  • Share I recently asked a question, and soon got a proper reply. I didn't expect such a good reply. The reply provided the expected Levelized Cost of Energy for wind, solar, and gas. I also didn't expect that wind and solar would be so much cheaper than gas. But there is one clarification, I'd like please. What gas price was assumed? Please express this year by year for a number of years. on Facebook Share I recently asked a question, and soon got a proper reply. I didn't expect such a good reply. The reply provided the expected Levelized Cost of Energy for wind, solar, and gas. I also didn't expect that wind and solar would be so much cheaper than gas. But there is one clarification, I'd like please. What gas price was assumed? Please express this year by year for a number of years. on Twitter Share I recently asked a question, and soon got a proper reply. I didn't expect such a good reply. The reply provided the expected Levelized Cost of Energy for wind, solar, and gas. I also didn't expect that wind and solar would be so much cheaper than gas. But there is one clarification, I'd like please. What gas price was assumed? Please express this year by year for a number of years. on Linkedin Email I recently asked a question, and soon got a proper reply. I didn't expect such a good reply. The reply provided the expected Levelized Cost of Energy for wind, solar, and gas. I also didn't expect that wind and solar would be so much cheaper than gas. But there is one clarification, I'd like please. What gas price was assumed? Please express this year by year for a number of years. link

    I recently asked a question, and soon got a proper reply. I didn't expect such a good reply. The reply provided the expected Levelized Cost of Energy for wind, solar, and gas. I also didn't expect that wind and solar would be so much cheaper than gas. But there is one clarification, I'd like please. What gas price was assumed? Please express this year by year for a number of years.

    rkmb asked about 2 months ago

    Thanks for the follow-up question! When calculating the Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE) for a natural gas plant there are three main subcomponents related to the gas commodity itself. There’s:

    • The price of the commodity (dollars per gigajoule)
    • Transportation and storage costs (to get the gas to the plant)
    • The carbon tax exposure associated with burning the gas

    The forecasts we use for future natural gas prices are provided by a third party and their methodologies are proprietary and confidential. However, there’s some publicly available data for the AECO-C natural gas prices (AECO is the gas market we trade in) from the Alberta Energy Regulator. TransGas does have public information for their transportation and storage rates, and the carbon price is public knowledge. We assume the carbon price will stay at $170/tonne after 2035. The carbon price is a material portion of the LCOE.

  • Share What was SaskPower's total cost of coal in 2023, and how much electricity, in net MWh, was produced by this coal? Also please provide the total energy content of the coal, in GJ. on Facebook Share What was SaskPower's total cost of coal in 2023, and how much electricity, in net MWh, was produced by this coal? Also please provide the total energy content of the coal, in GJ. on Twitter Share What was SaskPower's total cost of coal in 2023, and how much electricity, in net MWh, was produced by this coal? Also please provide the total energy content of the coal, in GJ. on Linkedin Email What was SaskPower's total cost of coal in 2023, and how much electricity, in net MWh, was produced by this coal? Also please provide the total energy content of the coal, in GJ. link

    What was SaskPower's total cost of coal in 2023, and how much electricity, in net MWh, was produced by this coal? Also please provide the total energy content of the coal, in GJ.

    rkmb asked about 2 months ago

    Thanks for your questions! The total cost of coal in 2022-23 was $318 million. 8,424 net GWh of electricity was produced by this coal. Learn more about our expenses, revenue, sales and more in our 2022-23 annual report. We’re unable to provide the total energy content of the coal due to contract confidentiality and competitive market sensitivity.

  • Share Please tell me, in detail, the price SaskPower expects to pay for the power provided by each IPP, year by year, starting 2024, for the term of the agreement with the IPP. Please also provide the rationale for any of these that exceed the expected cost of generation of SaskPower's gas-fired plants. on Facebook Share Please tell me, in detail, the price SaskPower expects to pay for the power provided by each IPP, year by year, starting 2024, for the term of the agreement with the IPP. Please also provide the rationale for any of these that exceed the expected cost of generation of SaskPower's gas-fired plants. on Twitter Share Please tell me, in detail, the price SaskPower expects to pay for the power provided by each IPP, year by year, starting 2024, for the term of the agreement with the IPP. Please also provide the rationale for any of these that exceed the expected cost of generation of SaskPower's gas-fired plants. on Linkedin Email Please tell me, in detail, the price SaskPower expects to pay for the power provided by each IPP, year by year, starting 2024, for the term of the agreement with the IPP. Please also provide the rationale for any of these that exceed the expected cost of generation of SaskPower's gas-fired plants. link

    Please tell me, in detail, the price SaskPower expects to pay for the power provided by each IPP, year by year, starting 2024, for the term of the agreement with the IPP. Please also provide the rationale for any of these that exceed the expected cost of generation of SaskPower's gas-fired plants.

    rkmb asked about 2 months ago

    Thanks for your question! Due to the competitive nature of the Request for Proposal (RFP) process we aren’t able to disclose the exact costs of existing or future Power Purchase Agreements (PPAs) with Independent Power Producers. However, we can provide a price range for the Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) for wind, solar and natural gas in Saskatchewan. LCOE includes the costs to build a facility, the fuel to run it, staffing, maintenance, decommissioning and the price SaskPower would pay through a third-party PPA. It’s important to note that LCOE calculations don’t consider the different characteristics of each supply option, like whether the power is baseload or intermittent or how they interact with the rest of the SaskPower system. So, no supply decisions can be made based on LCOE alone. Like many tools SaskPower uses, LCOE provides a snapshot in time and is updated regularly as various factors change. 

    As of March 5, 2023, the LCOE (before any potential government subsidies) in dollar per megawatt hour ($/MWh) is:

    • Wind: 50 – 65 $/MWh
    • Solar: 100 – 125 $/MWh
    • Natural Gas (Combined Cycle Gas Turbine): 145 – 170 $/MWh
    • Natural Gas (Simple Cycle Gas Turbine): 200 – 235 $/MWh


    There’s no one source that can meet all our province’s power needs. It will take a combination of sources to provide reliable, sustainable, cost-effective power into the future. That’s why it’s important that we keep a diverse mix of generation options, including baseload and intermittent generation options.

  • Share Why is wind expansion only really emphasized in the renewables plan? on Facebook Share Why is wind expansion only really emphasized in the renewables plan? on Twitter Share Why is wind expansion only really emphasized in the renewables plan? on Linkedin Email Why is wind expansion only really emphasized in the renewables plan? link

    Why is wind expansion only really emphasized in the renewables plan?

    Victoria asked 4 months ago

    Thanks for your question! Each of the four scenarios was created to explore different potential supply mixes. The Renewables 2035 scenario answers the question “What if you maximized winand solar resources?” So, that’s why you’ll see the emphasis on wind and solar in that scenario. Though there is an increase of renewables in the other scenarios too. The other scenarios were created to answer these questions:

    • “What’s your plan to keep power bills affordable while reducing emissions?”
    • “What could net zero by 2035 look like?”
    • “What if you reduced imported power and relied on in-province generation?”

    To learn more about each of the scenarios, please check out our blog: Exploring the Future of Our Power Supply: Scenarios to Consider (saskpower.com)

  • Share I am working on a project that will turn garbage into Biochar and using the waste heat for various projects. One of the waste heat options is the organic rankine cycle for electricity generation. Has SaskPower investigated this option for localized power generation? If yes, what was the result of this investigation? on Facebook Share I am working on a project that will turn garbage into Biochar and using the waste heat for various projects. One of the waste heat options is the organic rankine cycle for electricity generation. Has SaskPower investigated this option for localized power generation? If yes, what was the result of this investigation? on Twitter Share I am working on a project that will turn garbage into Biochar and using the waste heat for various projects. One of the waste heat options is the organic rankine cycle for electricity generation. Has SaskPower investigated this option for localized power generation? If yes, what was the result of this investigation? on Linkedin Email I am working on a project that will turn garbage into Biochar and using the waste heat for various projects. One of the waste heat options is the organic rankine cycle for electricity generation. Has SaskPower investigated this option for localized power generation? If yes, what was the result of this investigation? link

    I am working on a project that will turn garbage into Biochar and using the waste heat for various projects. One of the waste heat options is the organic rankine cycle for electricity generation. Has SaskPower investigated this option for localized power generation? If yes, what was the result of this investigation?

    C Skelton asked 2 months ago

    Thanks for your question! Waste heat is reliable and affordable making it an effective power source for our supply mix. Currently, we have 20 MW of waste heat available to our power system from four NRGreen projects owned and operated by an Independent Power Producer. These facilities use Ormat Energy Converter (OEC) technology. Ormat’s OEC is based on the Organic Rankine Cycle – a thermodynamic process that transfers heat to an organic motive fluid that is vaporized. The expansion pressure inside a vapor turbine drives a generator. You can learn more about Ormat here: Ormat Technologies Inc. - Ormat Technologies Inc. - Recovered Energy Generation and view our System Map for more information about the NRGreen Heat Recovery Facilities here: System Map (saskpower.com).

Page last updated: 22 May 2024, 10:10 AM